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International Day Of Protest For Ayotzinapa 43

Above photo: March in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. From Radiozitacuero.com.

Thousands Of Mexicans Take El Zócalo And Burn Figures Of Mexican President

By Maria G. Valdez in Latin Times

Mexico has a very deep wound right now after the disappearance of the 43 students in Ayotzinapa. On September 26, dozens of students took several buses to Iguala, and after a violent encounter with the police, 43 of them were allegedly taken to the police headquarters and never heard from them again. The government claimed the students where there to boycott a political event, but the students claim they were there to raise funds for their school. Mexican authorities eventually declared the students dead after weeks of investigation, but the people of Mexico are not letting this one go so easily.

They’ve had enough with the government, and this atrocious act was the last straw, which detonated a series of protests around the whole country. On November 20, 2014, multiple manifestations both in Mexico and of Mexicans living in other countries took place to show their support to the Ayotzinapa students and to tell the government that they’re tired of the corruption. The protest in Mexico City specifically took place at El Zócalo, where protesters took a cardboard figure of Enrique Peña Nieto and burned it at a stake, showing that the president’s approval rating might be dropping to an all time low.

Thousands took to the streets across Mexico protesting over President Enrique Peña Nieto's handling of the apparent massacre of the trainee school teachers after their abduction on the night of September 26. Reuters
Thousands took to the streets across Mexico protesting over President Enrique Peña Nieto’s handling of the apparent massacre of the trainee school teachers after their abduction on the night of September 26. Reuters
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A demonstrator wears a Guy Fawkes mask while holding a sign reading “Peña Out” during a protest in support of 43 missing Ayotzinapa students, in Monterrey November 20, 2014. Reuters
Mexico has been convulsed by protests since the 43 students were taken from the southwestern city of Iguala by police working with a local drug gang and then very likely incinerated, according to the government, which is still investigating the incident. Reuters
Mexico has been convulsed by protests since the 43 students were taken from the southwestern city of Iguala by police working with a local drug gang and then very likely incinerated, according to the government, which is still investigating the incident. Reuters
Demonstrators yell slogans in support of the missing Ayotzinapa students during a protest outside the Mexican embassy in San Salvador November 20, 2014. Reuters
Demonstrators yell slogans in support of the missing Ayotzinapa students during a protest outside the Mexican embassy in San Salvador November 20, 2014. Reuters
Demonstrators hold sketches and a photograph of missing Ayotzinapa students during a protest in San Salvador November 20, 2014. Reuters
Demonstrators hold sketches and a photograph of missing Ayotzinapa students during a protest in San Salvador November 20, 2014. Reuters
Masked demonstrators block an access road to the Benito Juarez International airport during a protest over the 43 missing Ayotzinapa students in Mexico City November 20, 2014. Reuters
Masked demonstrators block an access road to the Benito Juarez International airport during a protest over the 43 missing Ayotzinapa students in Mexico City November 20, 2014. Reuters

Members of the Center for Global Justice in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico report on a spirited march through the streets:

“With torches, photos of the 43 students, drums leading the way several hundred Mexicans and Foreigners marched from the Jardin down Zacateros -Ancho San Antonio-Salida a Celaya to La Casona [ the new convention center] delaying its inaugural event then on to El Pipila where several mounted El Pipila. Then all returned to the Jardin. . The protestors chanted in spanish: We want Justice, solemnly counted fro 1 to 43 – Guerrero has risen -Guanajuato rise up= wakeup..

We were in solidarity with the Youth calling for  the young normalistas to be returned alive  Fue el Estado. All the chants were in Spanish.

A Historical event for SMA. The foreign community had had an APOTZINAPA event in the Theater at the Bibliotecca on Wedesday where almost 100 showed up.

 

 
Below is a photo from twitter of an undercover member of the military, agent provocateur, throwing a molotov cocktail:

More photos of people protesting all over the world can be found by clicking here.

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