Newsletter: Privatization vs. The People

Privatization protest

By Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers for Popular Resistance. The essence of privatization today is to turn a public good into a profit center for Wall Street. US economic policy has created a wealth class that is grotesquely wealthy and under-taxed so that it has the money government needs to provide public services. This forces the government to borrow money from or sell a public service to the privateers or to create a public-private partnership (disguised corporate welfare and crony capitalism) in order to provide essential services. There is another way. We’ve reached a tipping point, as evidenced by the worldwide revolt through Occupy, the Arab Spring, the Indignados and other movements. We can reverse the trend toward privatization and inequality by claiming the commons for our mutual prosperity. If we believe in a more just, sustainable and democratic world, a world based on the common good, we will build the foundation for a world in which people work together to solve common problems and create an equitable economy that betters the lives for all.

The Long Game: Where Art Thou Public Education?

Save Our Schools

By Morna McDermott for Education Alchemy. The privatizers are busy at work. Unless you live under a rock (a tempting thought lately…) you probably feel like I do every time you turn on the news; the sensation of riding the Tilt a Whirl while taking ‘shrooms. It’s exhausting at best, and terrifying at worst; trying to untangle what is happening around us. Take Devos and her anti-Grizzly platform as the prime example of current insanity.We’re all made here The most recent effort toward destroying public ed comes in the form of the Choices in Education Act of 2017. I live in Maryland along with Andy Harris (R) who is co-sponsor of this bill. (lucky me). Many activists fighting against education reform are already on top of pushing back and calling for action against this bill, as well they (and we) should be. Like many of my friends and colleagues I am also strongly opposed to a voucher system for school funding and this bill.

Newsletter - Time To Ask Who We Are

It's Our Future

By Margaret Flower and Kevin Zeese for Popular Resistance. The United States has reached a turning point. Where we turn is dependent on what we do as people to determine our future. Neither of the major political parties are going to adequately solve the crises we face. This is a time to examine and discuss some fundamental issues: who we are and who we want to be. Out of crises come opportunities to put bold solutions in place. We are calling for a People’s Agenda. We have the power to make changes in this country that completely alter the course of our nation and the world. We can say no to genocide against Native Americans. We can end systemic racism. We can demand respect for the human rights of all people. We can promote peace and prosperity for all. We can solve the climate crisis. It is up to us and how we organize in our communities. At the heart of the success of popular movements is what we have advocated – the building of a broad and diverse unified movement that is active and has built national consensus for the changes we wish to see.

Frustrated Parents Rally Nationwide To ‘Reclaim Our Schools’

Education protest, October 2016, Education Fellows @Progressive4Ed.jpg-small

By Rebecca Klein for Huffington Post. More than 100,000 people took part in a nationwide “walk-in” at more than 2,000 schools in 238 cities, according to the event organizer Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools (AROS). They were joined by some high-profile guests, including Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine. At her Brooklyn school, Joseph and other community members protested the state funding system, which advocates say disadvantages needy schools. People in other cities rallied over issues like the expansion of charter schools and high-stakes student testing. Thursday’s walk-ins were the third time AROS said it had set up such an event and represented its largest effort so far. The alliance, which includes the nation’s two largest teachers unions and the Annenberg Institute for School Reform, advocates for equal educational opportunities, especially for low-income students of color.