The Ramapough Have A Protected Right To Self-Expression

On Alcatraz Island, a sunrise ceremony saw hundreds gather to honor the culture of Indigenous peoples and express solidarity with the fight against Dakota Access. (Photo: Fusion/Twitter)

By Chief Dwaine Perry and Betty Lyons for New Jersey – The Ramapough Lenape Nation is part of the great Lenape nation that populated broad swaths of what are now the Middle Atlantic States, from Connecticut to Maryland, when the first Europeans sailed across the ocean to seize land we had lived on since time immemorial. Despite centuries of genocidal exploitation of the land and peoples, here and across the United States, the Ramapough – recognized by the state of New Jersey as an indigenous nation – have survived and have no intention of going anywhere anytime soon. Critical to our continued identity – indeed, to our very existence – is our right to express ourselves culturally and collectively, as we have done on a 13.5 acre piece of riverfront land we have owned since 1986 in Mahwah Township.

Society Of Native Nations – Official Two Rivers Camp

FB/Two Rivers Camp - Stop Trans Pecos Pipeline

By Staff of Two Rivers Camp – Stop Trans Pecos Pipeline – All people coming to Two Rivers Camp, ONCE AGAIN there is “NO alcohol, weapons or DRUGS” allowed at camp and that means “Marijana” in case anyone does not understand that. PLEASE honor and respect the rules of the camp that are stated on the pined post on this page and on the sign as you drive in to camp that says no drugs allowed. The rules are to protect the camp, people at the camp, the elders requests, the teachings, and the sacred fire. If anyone DISRESPECTS the rules of the camp, you will be asked to leave the camp. Please dont be selfish, dont just think of your own wants or needs, and please dont be disrespectful. Please remember why we are coming together “we need you all” Please help to protect the camp and all the people that come to the camp, especially the children, it is the children and there future we are fighting for.

Defund DAPL Spreads Across Indian Country As Tribes Divest

by Ethan Buckner

By Frances Madeson for Counter Punch – “Many people are, rightfully, afraid that executive support [President Trump’s] now means that the pipelines are full steam ahead,” said Melanie Yazzie, co-founder of The Red Nation, an activist coalition dedicated to the liberation of Native people from capitalism and colonialism. She views divestment as obstruction—the good kind—something akin to water protectors locking down on construction equipment and as a continuation of the widespread resistance that has united under the cry of #NoDAPL. “The investors and financiers will not move forward if the projects are deemed financially unfavorable,” Yazzie said.

Tohono O'odham Nation Tribal Leaders Say Wall With Mexico Will Not Be Built On Their Land

Public Art In Philadelphia Tells The Stories Of The Undocumented

By Carrie Jung for KJZZ – Tribal leadership of Tohono O’odham Nation in southern Arizona said they won’t support a border wall project on their land. Part of their reservation extends into Mexico and covers 75 miles of the international border. The tribe’s chairman and vice chair said the plan was always to try to work with whoever holds the office of the United States President. But, they added, it’s still too early to tell exactly how Donald Trump’s administration will impact the tribe. Vice Chairman Verlon Jose explained tribal members have traversed their ancestral land since time immemorial, and a wall of any sort would not be supported by the community.

5 Ways Indian Country Can Resist Trump’s Chaos

Sioux women at Mandan, North Dakota, in 1912.

By Mark Trahant for Yes! Magazine – How does Indian Country survive the Donald Trump era? The new administration is only a few days old, and already the chaos of the times has upset business as usual—and possibly the very structure of federal Indian law. And it’s not just Washington. The North Dakota Legislature in Bismarck acts as if it has permission to ignore the Constitution and legal precedent in its relationship with tribes. House Concurrent Resolution 3017 calls on Congress to “modify” the reservation system and put the state in charge. This resolution will last about 15 minutes if and when legislators put a pencil to what it would actually cost its taxpayers.

Indigenous-Led Direct Action Campaign Continues In West Texas

An Indigenous Water Protector with the Frontera Water Protection Alliance locks to a track hoe, a machine being used to construct Energy Transfer Partner's Comanche Trail pipeline in El Paso County, on Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo: Courtesy of Frontera Water Protection Alliance)

By Candice Bernd for Truthout – Marfa, Texas—A new Indigenous-led direct action campaign is gaining momentum with two more lockdown actions targeting Energy Transfer Partners’ (ETP) twin pipeline projects in far West Texas. An Indigenous Water Protector and an Alpine resident were arrested Saturday, January 14, after locking themselves to pipe-laying equipment at an ETP easement and work site in Presidio County, Texas. The lockdown disrupted construction on the company’s 148-mile Trans-Pecos pipeline that, if completed, would carry 1.4 billion cubic feet of fracked gas from West Texas to Mexico every day.

The Rights Of Nature: Indigenous Philosophies Reframing Law

indigenous-Ecuador-RAN-2

By Kiana Herold for IC – Indigenous battles to defend nature have taken to the streets, leading to powerful mobilizations like the gathering at Standing Rock. They have also taken to the courts, through the development of innovative legal ways of protecting nature. In Ecuador, Bolivia and New Zealand, indigenous activism has helped spur the creation of a novel legal phenomenon—the idea that nature itself can have rights. The 2008 constitution of Ecuador was the first national constitution to establish rights of nature. In this legal paradigm shift, nature changed from being held as property to a rights-bearing entity. Rights are typically given to actors who can claim them—humans—but they have expanded especially in recent years to non-human entities such as corporations, animals and the natural environment.

Wisconsin Tribe Votes To Evict Oil Pipeline From Its Reservation

The success of the Native Americans opposing the Dakota Access pipeline has inspired other tribes, including a band of Chippewa Indians in Wisconsin, to oppose other projects on tribal land. Credit: Getty Images

By Phil McKenna for Inside Climate News – The Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians in northern Wisconsin voted not to renew an easement for a major oil and gas pipeline that passes through its reservation. In the wake of the successful protest against the Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota, this decision is the latest example of Native American tribes using sovereignty rights to oppose fossil fuel projects. The Bad River tribal council voted unanimously in early January to revoke rights-of-way that pass through the roughly 200-square-mile reservation and the decision could prove difficult to overturn. Pipeline companies often take ownership of private land through the use of eminent domain.

Police Killed More Native Americans In 2016 Than Previous Year

Indian lives matter student put in police wagon. Image Credi Light Brigading

By Simon Moya-Smith for Indian Country Media Network. The number of Native Americans killed by police nearly doubled in 2016 compared to the previous year, according to reports. Last year, an estimated 21 Native Americans were killed by law enforcement. In 2015, police killed 13 Native Americans, The Counted, a tabulation of all police killings in the U.S., revealed. A 2014 study by The Center of Juvenile and Criminal Justice reported that, per capita, Native Americans are more likely to be killed by police than any other demographic in the U.S.

Newsletter - The Consent Of The Governed

Revolt Source UPI

By Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese. Governments function because of the consent of the governed. When a government does not serve the needs or interests of the people, it loses its legitimacy and no longer deserves the consent of the people.Plutocracy defined We have argued for a long time that current governments at all levels – local, state and federal -function primarily to benefit the wealthy. Academics have proven that the United States is a plutocracy – rule of, by and for the wealthy. It is time for us to withdraw our consent. Let’s consider how to do that and what protections will be needed. When a government loses the consent of the people, all it has left to wield to keep its power is repression and force. Cooperation Jackson and the Malcolm X Grassroots Organizing Movement, is calling for “a program of noncompliance and noncooperation on both the federal and state levels.” We have entered a new era, a presidency of protest and an increasing illegitimate government. We have the power to withdraw our consent from hate and exploitation and build love and prosperity.

Shootings On Backwater Bridge

The All-Nite Images / Flickr

By Four Arrows for Truth Out – Late afternoon on December 27, “Lunatic Outpost” released a video showing a group of about “20 to 50″ Water Protectors who, while returning from a prayer walk along the Cannonball River, were chased down by armed security from DAPL and Morton County Sheriff’s Department. A helicopter and tracked vehicles were involved in the pursuit. Behind the images of the large number of police and security dotting the snow-covered terrain played, background radios from the Standing Rock medics could be heard. “We need a medic team. We need a team ready to roll now.” Then the narrator says “Four women were taken away in a red paddy wagon of some sort.”

Christmas And Resistance To Slavery In The Americas

Burning of the Roehampton Estate during the Baptist War, a slave revolt initiated in Jamaica on Christmas Day, 1831

By Yesenia Barragan for African American Intellectual History Society. It was a humid Christmas day in 1820 when twenty-five-year-old Santiago Martínez presented himself before the army commander stationed in the frontier Colombian town of Quibdó for service in the republican army. Just the year prior, in 1819, the new republic of Gran Colombia, a nation encompassing the present-day countries of Colombia, Venezuela, Panama, and Ecuador, was created in the final throes of the Wars of Independence against Spain. Four feet and five inches tall, with a notable, long scar on his right cheek up to his eyebrow, Martínez sought to serve in the local army, perhaps heeding Independence leader Simón Bolívar’s call for voluntary conscription in the young Andean nation. According to army records, Martínez declared that he was a “liberto,” a free black or formerly enslaved person, and that he was a “worker” [labrador] by profession.

Ecuador’s Indigenous People Take Their Case Against Chevron To Canada

Chevron’s Kern River oil field in California’s Central Valley. CREDIT: AP

By Yasmin Khan for Counter Punch – With eyes red with fatigue, Pablo Fajardo stood in front of a room of activists in Toronto, Canada explaining the plight of the more than 30,000 indigenous peoples and farmers whose lands in the Ecuadorian Amazon are covered in toxic sludge. Fajardo was presenting evidence that the pollution stems from decades of oil extractions by Chevron-Texaco, one of the world’s largest oil companies. He and his clients are fighting a drawn-out legal battle that is part of a growing list of high-profile cases brought by indigenous communities against extractive industries…

Devon Energy Ends Leases To Drill Near Blackfeet Nation

by Murray Foubister / Flickr.

By Michael J. Dax for Yes! Magazine – As Badger Creek’s oxbows meandered below, Tatsey, who sits on the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council, soaked in the gentle undulations of the green foothills and silhouetted peaks that stretched across the horizon as he described the responsibility he feels for the land. “Blackfeet think of time in seven-generation increments, and my grandfather was the first generation,” he began. With his daughter beside him and the afternoon sun lowering behind the mountains, he gestured toward his grandkids running wildly around the hill, adding proudly, “Their grandkids will be the seventh generation. I have to start teaching them to be responsible for this place.”

Stop The Suwannee River Crossing!

Blockade of the Santa Fe River drilling site, Nov 5, 2016

By Staff of Sabal Trail Resistance – As you read this, drilling under is complete under the Santa Fe River, after two months of battle. It has now begun under the Suwannee River. If unopposed, could be done as quick as 4 to 6 weeks. But it will not be unopposed, and the sooner you come to the front lines the longer it will take to be completed. These two waterways are at the heart of a region which contains the highest concentration of fresh water springs in the world. There are currently two full-time encampments in North Florida and the possibility of more to emerge along the route with your support and participation. You are invited to help build opposition on the ground to this fracked gas pipeline.