Green Groups Restart Fight Against Keystone XL Pipeline

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By John Zangas for DC Media Group – Environmental groups rallied at the White House Friday afternoon in a new commitment to do whatever it takes to stop the Keystone XL pipeline. The call to action came as the Trump administration issued permission to restart the pipeline, a project which was considered defeated in November 2015, when Obama rejected final approval of the State Department permits. The project was previously the focus of an epic six-year battle between TransCanada Corporation and hundreds of environmental groups, between 2010-2015, which grew out of grassroots organizing and into a major environmental movement. The battle was waged with a broad range of groups, including Indigenous people, students, clergy, green groups and involved legal challenges.

Keystone XL Pipeline Foes Rev Up Fight Again After Trump’s Rubber Stamp

An anti-Keystone XL sign is posted to a tree in Nebraska, where staunch opposition led project owner TransCanada to move the oil pipeline out of the environmentally fragile Nebraska Sandhills. Credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

By Marianne Lavelle for Inside Climate News – This story was updated at 10:45 am ET on March 24 to include comments from President Donald Trump, TransCanada. The White House’s approval of the Keystone XL pipeline Friday opens a fierce, new battle over a project that has become a front in the fight against climate change. President Donald Trump made reviving the 1,200-mile pipeline, which will transport heavy crude oil from tar sands mines in Canada to refineries on the Gulf Coast, a key plank of his fossil fuel-focused energy plan. He promised in January to reverse President Barack Obama’s rejection of the TransCanada project, one of Obama’s signature environmental decisions, within 60 days.

Newsletter: Privatization vs. The People

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By Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers for Popular Resistance. The essence of privatization today is to turn a public good into a profit center for Wall Street. US economic policy has created a wealth class that is grotesquely wealthy and under-taxed so that it has the money government needs to provide public services. This forces the government to borrow money from or sell a public service to the privateers or to create a public-private partnership (disguised corporate welfare and crony capitalism) in order to provide essential services. There is another way. We’ve reached a tipping point, as evidenced by the worldwide revolt through Occupy, the Arab Spring, the Indignados and other movements. We can reverse the trend toward privatization and inequality by claiming the commons for our mutual prosperity. If we believe in a more just, sustainable and democratic world, a world based on the common good, we will build the foundation for a world in which people work together to solve common problems and create an equitable economy that betters the lives for all.

Keystone XL Fighters Ready To Take On Canada’s Trudeau On First Visit With Trump

About 100 protesters made sure Justin Trudeau saw their objections to the Keystone XL pipeline at the Canadian Embassy./Photo by Anne Meador

By Anne Meador for DC Media Group – Washington, DC–President Donald Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau embraced warmly today at their first official meeting at the White House, finding common cause in building oil pipelines, among other things. But protesters, who staked out Trudeau at the Canadian embassy later in the afternoon, made sure that the Prime Minister saw their determination to fight fossil fuel infrastructure. Among the flurry of executive orders issued during the first week of President Trump’s term was a memorandum he signed regarding the northern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline. It invites TransCanada to re-submit its application for Keystone XL and instructs the Secretary of State to expedite review and render a decision within 60 days.

Newsletter: Protest Is Working & Growing

Resist banner flies over the Donald Trump White House by Greenpeace.

By Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers for Popular Resistance. People are recognizing that they have power to protest in a lot of areas. Some see the potential for protest at work, such as the resistance and non-cooperation among federal workers. And, many are planning on building toward a general strike, something unheard of in US history. State officials are even talking about protesting by not paying federal taxes. Early in the Trump era, protest is working and the potential ahead is for an even larger resistance movement. The dysfunctional nature of government will add to protest movements, making the country ungovernable. We can defeat the oligarchy, as currently represented by Trump, but which began long before him, by remaining independent of the corporate parties and fighting for the changes we need.

Corruption Of Keystone: Congressional Permits To Drill Don’t Change Public Opinion

House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) signs the Keystone XL Pipeline bill during a ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington, February 13, 2015. The bill was sent to President Obama, who vetoed it. (Jabin Botsford/The New York Times).

By Rebecca Adamson for Truthout – When TransCanada Corporation announced its plans for a Keystone XL pipeline expansion project in 2008, the company projected capital costs to be $4.3 billion for the entire project. After 6 years of waiting for US executive approval, including countless congressional votes, a Nebraska Supreme Court case and a president who has yet to budge, TransCanada increased estimated capital investments for the pipeline another $2.5 billion. The reason? “Lengthy delays,” undoubtedly exacerbated by community protests and opposition from environmental and social interest groups. One of the loudest proponents of pipeline opposition, and arguably the most vulnerable, are North America’s Indigenous Peoples

Keystone XL Opponents Promise Trump Mass Mobilization

"We will fight back through through the courts, protests, and any means available and necessary," says Eriel Deranger of the Athabasca Chippewayan First Nation. (Photo: Pax Ahimsa Gethen/flickr/cc)

By Deirdre Fulton for Common Dreams – With his order to revive the Keystone XL (KXL) pipeline, President Donald Trump “has declared war on Indigenous nations across the country,” one Cheyenne River Sioux organizer said Monday. But he’ll be met by a fierce native resistance movement that “will not back down,” said the organizer, Joye Braun, on a press call organized by the Indigenous Environmental Movement (IEN). Trump signed executive orders last week advancing the controversial KXL and Dakota Access (DAPL) pipelines, prompting widespread outrage and vows of bold resistance from the Indigenous activists, climate campaigners, and countless others who have fought against both projects.

Keystone XL, Dakota Pipeline Green-Lighted In Trump Executive Actions

Pipeline protesters may be making their way back to the White House after Donald Trump's latest actions seeking to revive the Keystone XL and Dakota Access. Credit: Getty Images

By Phil McKenna for Inside Climate News – President Trump uses early directive to clear the way for two major, controversial oil pipelines to get built, countering Obama decisions to the contrary. President Donald Trump issued executive actions on Tuesday to revive two highly contested oil pipelines previously blocked by the Obama administration. The Keystone XL tar sands pipeline and the Dakota Access pipeline had become litmus tests of President Obama’s commitment to the fight against climate change as each project galvanized widespread grassroots opposition. Disputes over them had also created a bitter split over fossil fuel development that sharply divided Democrats from Republicans.

2017: Pipeline Resistance Gathers Steam From Dakota Access, Keystone Success

Demonstrators gather in front of the White House in Washington, D.C., to protest the Dakota Access pipeline. Opposition to the project has further inspired activists around the country to fight pipelines in their backyard. Credit: JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

By Lisa Song for Inside Climate News – When President-elect Donald Trump takes office next month, his pro-drilling, anti-climate action energy policy will buoy the oil industry. But it will also face staunch resistance from a pipeline opposition movement that gathered momentum, particularly with this year’s successful showdown over the Dakota Access pipeline, and shows no signs of slowing. Local grassroots action, governments’ environmental concerns and market forces have stopped or delayed dozens of fossil fuel projects since the high-profile Keystone XL pipeline was cancelled in November 2015, and activists are continuing to oppose at least a dozen oil and gas pipelines around the country.

Canada’s Trudeau Says Trump Very Supportive Of Keystone XL Pipeline

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at a meeting of the Calgary Chamber of Commerce in Calgary, Alberta, Canada December 21, 2016. REUTERS/Todd Korol

By Nia Williams and Ethan Lou for Reuters – Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Wednesday that U.S. President-elect Donald Trump was “very supportive” of TransCanada Corp’s proposed Keystone XL crude oil pipeline in their first conversation after the U.S. election. “He actually brought up Keystone XL and indicated that he was very supportive of it,” Trudeau told an event in Calgary, Canada’s oil capital. “I’m confident that the right decisions will be taken.” Trudeau, who too supports Keystone XL, said also he saw “extraordinary opportunities” for his country if the United States under Trump steps back from tackling climate change…

Oil Leak From Keystone Pipeline 89 Times Worse Than Originally Thought

AP PHOTO/NATI HARNIK

By Alejandro Davila Fragoso for Climate Progress – Nearly a week after pipeline operator TransCanada shut down a section of its Keystone line over an oil leak, the company reported Thursday thousands of gallons of oil were spilled, not less than 200 as it first said. Based on soil excavations, TransCanada said about 16,800 gallons of oil leaked onto a field in South Dakota, the Associated Press reported. After the leak was discovered Saturday and the line was shut, TransCanada said about 187 gallons of crude oil had spilled, an accident that environmental groups said shows the dangers of shipping oil by pipeline.

TransCanada’s Other Massive Pipeline Plan

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TransCanada’s Keystone XL tar sands pipeline has been front and center in a heated continental energy and climate debate for over four years now – and President Obama is sounding more and more like he is poised to make the right decision and reject the pipeline that would carry high carbon, high risk, high cost bitumen through North America’s heartland. As you probably can imagine, tar sands producers and shippers will not give up easily in their efforts to get Canadian oil to international markets – where they can make more money selling their oil. TransCanada has recently proposed an even bigger pipeline called Energy East that would carry 1.1 million barrels of tar sands oil from Alberta, across all of central and Eastern Canada to Atlantic refineries and ports.

Florida Employee ‘Punished For Using Phrase Climate Change’

Governor Rick Scott has ardently denied that there is an unwritten ban on using the terms climate change and global warming. Photograph: Chris O'Meara/AP

An employee of Florida’s environmental protection department was forced to take a leave of absence and seek a mental health evaluation for violating governor Rick Scott’s unwritten ban on using the phrases “climate change” or “global warming” under any circumstance, according to a complaint filed against the state. Longtime employee Barton Bibler reportedly included an explicit mention of climate change in his official notes from a Florida Coastal Managers Forum meeting in late February, during which climate change, rising sea levels and the possible environmental impact of the Keystone XL Pipeline were discussed. On 9 March, Bibler received a formal reprimand for “misrepresenting that ‘the official meeting agenda included climate change’”, according to a statement from Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (Peer).

Out Of Public Glare Massive Pipeline Network Being Built Across US

A depot used to store pipes for Transcanada Corp’s planned Keystone XL oil pipeline in Gascoyne, North Dakota. Photograph: Andrew Cullen/Reuters

In a far corner of North Dakota, just a few hundred miles from the proposed path of the Keystone XL pipeline, 84,000 barrels of crude oil per day recently began flowing through a new line that connects the state’s sprawling oilfields to an oil hub in Wyoming. In West Texas, engineers activated a new pipeline that cuts diagonally across the state to deliver crude from the oil-rich Permian Basin to refineries near Houston. And in a string of towns in Kansas, Iowa and South Dakota, local government officials are scrutinizing the path of pipeline extensions that would pass nearby. While the Keystone project awaits a final decision, scenes like these are unfolding almost every week in lesser-known developments that have quietly added more than 11,600 miles of pipeline to the nation’s domestic oil network.

14 Arrested In Citizens’ Protest Against Climate Change Denial

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This morning members of 350-Missoula, Blue Skies Campaign, and CAJA3 (Community Action for Justice in the Americas, Africa, and Asia) held a sit-in at the Missoula office of Senator Steve Daines to protest the senator’s denial of climate change science and his support for fossil fuel projects like coal exports, the Otter Creek Coal Mine, and the Keystone XL pipeline. Fourteen people were arrested for refusing to leave Daines’ office in a peaceful act of civil disobedience, while around seventy supporters stood outside holding protest signs. “We are here today because we want our elected representatives to stop greenlighting harmful industries such as coal exports and the Keystone XL pipeline, and to support renewable energy and a clean, sustainable economy,” said Meaghan Browne from Butte.