US Intelligence Official Advising Guaido On His ‘Regional Tour’

| Educate!

Juan Guaido and Kimberly Breier pose for a photo with Brazilian officials during his visit to Brazil earlier this week. Photo from Twitter @WHAAsstSecty.

Gauido’s intelligence advisor is Kimberly Breier, a 20-year-experienced U.S. intelligence professional.

Since leaving Venezuela on Feb. 22, despite a travel-ban in place against him, opposition lawmaker Juan Guaido has deployed an intense agenda of attacking democratically elected President Nicolas Maduro as he travels to Colombia, Brazil, Paraguay, and other South American countries, whose right-wing leaders were quick to throw their support behind his self-proclamation as interim president.

Besides traveling with his wife Fabiana Rosales, who has accompanied him on each visit as if they were performing official trips, Guaido has been accompanied by another woman: U.S. senior official Kimberly Breier.

A brief look at her social media posts reveals how Breier constantly her close presence and collaboration with Guaido to achieve his political objectives of ousting the legitimate government in Venezuela, in line with the interests of her superiors in Washington.

On Mar. 5, 2018, President Donald Trumppresented Breier as a “key addition” to his staff, appointing her as Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs.

She earned a B.A. in Spanish from Middlebury College and a M.A. in Latin American Studies from Georgetown University, an institution some claim to be known for training future Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) employees.

According to information available at the U.S. State Department, where she served as a member of the Western Hemisphere Policy Planning Staff, Breier is “an intelligence professional with more than 20 years of experience in foreign policy”, mostly focused on Latin American issues.

Previously, at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), she headed the Americas Program and the U.S.-Mexico Futures Initiative, a program that deals with bilateral U.S.-Mexico issues such as trade agreement renegotiation, border security, and immigration.

Breier was also Director of the National Policy Association’s North American Committee, which is a business committee with members from the United States, Canada and Mexico.

Among other private sector and think tank experiences, she was president of a consulting firm, which provided “country risk assessment teams” for clients located in Mexico, Argentina, and Chile.

From January 2005 to June 2006, during President George W. Bush Administration, Breier served as Director for Brazil and the Southern Cone, Director for Mexico and Canada, and interim Director for the Andean region.

Needless to say, this Massachusetts-native diplomat speaks Spanish fluently and has traveled extensively through Latin America.

  • Pat moore

    What if Maduro sent someone here to play a role as president?
    I might support him over Trump.

  • Jon

    Or, we can invite Venezuela to send election monitors, since their electoral process is one the the best in the word for honesty, and the same cannot be said of the USA.