Zeese: The War On The War On Drugs

| Resistance Report

Above Photo War on drugs is a war on us from SouthernCoalition.org

Kevin Zeese is a well known fighter of the system and has been on the front lines of many fights – from health care to digital rights. But it all started with an internship at NORML 36 years ago. So, what did marijuana politics look like back then, where are we now and how do we keep going in this fight against senseless prohibition?

The interview examines howending the drug war, especially the war on marijuana, has moved from being a third rail politicial issue to having widespread mainstream support. The legalization of marijuana in Colorado and three other states with more on the horizon is not showing any serious problems and is bringing in millions of dollars in new taxes while savings millions on law enforcement. Zeese explains how the most powerful way to deal with drug abuse is not laws that make them illegal, which have all sorts of unexpected consequences, but cultural controls where people learn what is appropriate and inappropriate drug use. These cultural controls are actually undermined by the war on drugs.

Zeese also explains how the drug war is linked to other issues in that (1) we are seeking justice on a wide range of issus including police violence, fair and living wages, climate justice, housing justice and the like; and (2) progress toward justice is blocked by a power structure that puts profits ahead of the necessities of the people and the protection of the planet. He urges us to understand the links between these issue so that we can build a bigger social movement for economic, racial and enviornmental justice.

 

  • truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

    Interesting video.

  • AlanMacDonald

    Kevin, as you so well tie together and “explain how the drug war is linked to other issues in that (1) we are seeking justice on a wide range of issues including police violence, fair and living wages, climate justice, housing justice and the like; and (2) progress toward justice is blocked by a power structure that puts profits ahead of the necessities of the people and the protection of the planet. He urges us to understand the links between these issue so that we can build a bigger social movement for economic, racial and environmental justice” — all of these pressing ‘issues’ which oppress justice and cause more deadly, even existential threats (from nuclear war to environmental death), are indeed cause by a “power structure” which the people need to understand and non-violently confront.

    Which is why I typically end my comments agreeing with you this way.

    Liberty, equality, democracy, and justice
    Over
    Violent (and Vichy disguised)
    Empire,

    Alan